0
Items
{{Cart.Items}}
Items Subtotal: {{Cart.SubTotal}} a
Your cart is currently empty.
{{Item.Name}}
{{ChildItem.Quantity}} x {{ChildItem.Cost}} {{ChildItem.Total}}
Price:
{{Item.Cost}}
{{Item.ProductRetailUnit}}
+
Remove from cart
{{Item.RRPTotal}}
Sale Price
{{Item.PromoTotal}}
Multi-Buy
{{Item.Name}}
{{ChildItem.Quantity}} x {{ChildItem.Cost}} {{ChildItem.Total}}
Price:
{{Item.Cost}}
{{Item.ProductRetailUnit}}
+
Remove from cart
{{Item.RRPTotal}}
Sale Price
{{Item.PromoTotal}}
There are no products in your shopping cart
+
_
{{Ad.Header}}
{{Ad.DealType}}
{{Ad.BadgeBiLine}}
{{Ad.Description}}
View Deal h
There was an error processing deals for this cart. Please refresh your browser or check again later to see if you are eligible for special offers.

{{Cart.Items}} Items - Subtotal
{{Cart.SubTotal}}


While there will also be numerous supporters for blue cod, hapuku, kingfish and marlin instead,
there’s no doubting that snapper is the most popular fish targeted by Kiwi anglers.

Available over the more northern two-thirds of our country’s coastline, snapper are found in all sorts of terrain, feed on a wide variety of sea creatures, and can be caught using almost every conceivable method. They also reach pretty hefty weights – at least 18kg - are tough, scrappy fighters, look colourfully handsome, and offer very tasty table fare, so no wonder we love them.

Snapper are not especially fussy about what they eat, so, as already mentioned, they can be found feeding in widely ranging environments, from shallow, sandy beaches and bays through to mangrove-choked estuaries and rocky, weedy coastlines, right out into 100m-plus depths. This sees them fished for with equally diverse methods and equipment from the beaches, rocks and wharves, while the fish further out are chased with kayaks, jet-skis and all sizes of boats. Lures and baits can be used very effectively to catch them, and both approaches have their passionate supporters. Snapper are also found in other countries, along with various similar looking sub species, and because there are also lots of other species called ‘snapper’ that bear little resemblance to these worldwide, our species is officially called ‘squirefish’ by the IGFA, the organisation that processes and keeps the world’s sport fishing records.



Straylining Bottom Fishing
Slow Jigging Softbaits
Rock Fishing Surfcasting